The Right Frame of Mind

Now that we finally have a piece of work that resembles a full performance, we have been able to start considering other elements surrounding our work, such as, how an audience might view it and how we can archive what we are doing. We have attempted to do a couple of ‘dress runs’ of the performance, and this has opened up many new routes that we could take with the finished piece. So naturally, we shall continue to make adjustments to the piece before its final showing.

One question that came up after our preview was: How could we frame our work? The positioning of our piece is very important as we are representing everything that the library is inside, outside.In his book Site Specific Art, Nick Kaye states that “the ‘inside’ of the work is always already penetrated by the outside’ (Kaye 2000, p. 192), therefore choosing the right sort of frame for our work was vital in order to allow the audience to interpret the desired meaning of our piece. Having thought about this, we thought that the perfect place to perform our work would be in front of the construction site of the new extension of the library; after all we would then be deconstructing language in front of the construction of the place that is the centre of language. This could potentially create a very strong image to an audience. In his book Site Specific Art, Nick Kaye states that “the ‘inside’ of the work is always already penetrated by the outside’ (Kaye 2000, p. 192), therefore choosing the right sort of frame for our work was vital in order to allow the audience to interpret the desired meaning of our piece.

Secondly, we began to think about what we could do to “fill the gaps” between our individual readings. This led us to create motifs that were relevant to our personal ‘language breakers’. For example, I am using French to break down the library list, so after my performance I will kiss each individual piece of card that I am holding. This is because if someone were to say the term ‘French kiss’, it would conjure up the typical image that most people have of this phrase, however I am breaking this down by giving each piece of card that has French writing on it a single kiss, therefore challenging the semiotics surrounding the term. Another example is that Hannah holding the book in various different ways. This is to demonstrate the fact that we talk about being able to hold a book in an infinite number of ways, but once again we are unable to truly demonstrate what infinity is, being only human.

Lastly, we decided that we would like to archive our work, and show the progression over the four performances. This is where the idea of the pieces of card that we have written our lists on comes in. We decided that, rather than simply read off A4 pieces of paper on a clip board, we would hand write our lists on small rectangular pieces of cards. The thought process behind this was that when we went to the library in Lincoln town centre, they had thousands and thousands of pieces of card with all their records on archived at the back of the building. This made us think how fantastic it would be to mimic this by creating our own record of our performance, with the pieces of card all marked in our individual way. It would really tie the library into our performance.

The plan now is to do one last run through of our piece before the official performance dates, in order to receive yet more feed back. Hopefully we can create something that people will be able to look back on as part of the library’s history.

Works Cited

Kaye, Nick (2000) Site-specific Art, London and New York: Routledge

Posted: April 28th, 2013
Categories: Library, Taking the Library Outside
Tags: , , ,
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