Posts Tagged ‘Natasha Nicholls’

Amen

'it can stage and frame those who inhabit its spaces' (Pearson 2010, p.21) Cox, Emily 03/05/13, University of Lincoln Library.

‘it can stage and frame those who inhabit its spaces’ (Pearson 2010, p.21) Cox, Emily 03/05/13, University of Lincoln Library.

'writing composed of the marks of nature itself' (Foucault 1989, p.43) Cox, Emily 03/05/13, University of Lincoln Library.

‘writing composed of the marks of nature itself’ (Foucault 1989, p.43) Cox, Emily 03/05/13, University of Lincoln Library.

'invasion of space by text' (Augé, Marc 1995, p.99) Cox, Emily 03/05/13, University of Lincoln Library

‘invasion of space by text’ (Augé, Marc 1995, p.99) Cox, Emily 03/05/13, University of Lincoln Library

THE IMAGE= Immersive. Engaging.  We took inspiration from Allan Kaprow and Duncan Speakman’s flash/subtle mobs, spontaneous events happening in ‘unexpected places’1 to connect people in the space and to ground the books used in its site, its home.  This then enabled us to take advantage of the architecture of the building, manipulating its structure and using the bookshelves to house the performance.

The library is a ‘non-place’2 one that ‘encourages people to travel through a landscape rather than inhabit it (ibid).  TIME= to create a durational but non-lasting, momentary performance = leave the scattered debris for a couple of hours.  It allowed the audience passing through the library to observe the performance and/or remains that alerted them to the different functions of a library.  The difference in audience opinion is what helped to enhance the ambiguity in our meaning = MOMENTARY.

A reason why we also chose to DOCUMENT our performance with photographs.  Photographs are fragmented, the gaps in between the taking of photos allowing the audience to interpret the performance and create their own story from what they see.  (Also influenced by Poiret.  See Fashion blog post).

Small ‘fragments of text’3, translating small sections of L’art Religieux combined with the theme of sacrifice inspired by its images, created our journey; –

France-1908-history-era/content of L’art Religieux-13th Century-sacrifice-statues-rituals-Religion versus Science-belief-INFINITY of KNOWLEDGE =  THE LIBRARY OF BABEL.

Word Count: 288

Overall Word Count: 3,988 (inc.’Final Thoughts’ group blog)

Works Cited:

(1)    Witts, Noel (2010) Tadeusz Kantor: Routledge Performance Practitioners, London and New York: Routledge, p.18.

(2)    Govan, Emma, Helen Nicholson and Kate Normington (2007) Making a Performance: Devising Histories and Contemporary Practices, Oxon: Routledge, p.120.

(3)    Forcedentertainment.com (2012) forced entertainment, Online: http://www.forcedentertainment.com/  (accessed 30 Apr 2013).

  1. Witts 2010, p.18 []
  2. Govan 2007, p.127 []
  3. Forcedentertainment.com 2012 []
Posted: May 9th, 2013
Categories: Les dames des livres, Library
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1 week to go…

We practiced standing on chairs in a studio to get a feel for the potential duration we could be standing on the chairs without moving, food or drink.

Things we liked:

*How we unconsciously began to create a rhythm between all three tools we are using, the sound of paper being dipped in water, the scratching sound of the pin and the course tearing of the paper by the pumice stone

*The intensity of our focus, trance like and absorbed in what we were doing; ritualistic, hypnotic.  Made us feel at peace that juxtaposes our actions on the books

*The floors around each of us became scattered with book pages and debris from the tools, especially with Kirsty and I who had water splashes around her, and I with dust from the stone.

Feedback from lecturers:

*Be aware of controversy over destroying Darwin’s book.  Being in the middle of the library, people who pass by may be offended at what we are doing.  Make people aware that our meaning to this piece is ambiguous, open to interpretation and not meant to be read as a political statement.  A sign?

*Possibly switch instruments halfway through to help to maintain audience engagement and prevent our bodies from getting repetitive strain injury from carrying out the same motion for too long.

Word Count: 218

Posted: May 9th, 2013
Categories: Les dames des livres, Library
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Religion Versus Science

 

Please Listen:   Religion_Blog

 

05/05/13 suite101.com

05/05/13 suite101.com

Word Count: 9

Works Cited (in spoken order) :

Mediahistory.umn.edu (1996) Who Destroyed Alexandria’s Famous Library?/ Media History Project/U of M, Online: http://www.mediahistory.umn.edu/archive/alexandria.html , 18 March 2013).

OverBlog (2012) Babel Renaissante, Online: http://www.grabarczyk.fr/article-babel-renaissante-109413056.html (accessed 5 May 2013).

Foucault, Michel (1989) The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences, London, Routledge, p.40.

Trumble, Kelly (2003) The Library of Alexandria, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, p.2.

Trumble, Kelly (2003) The Library of Alexandria, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, p.7.

MacLeod, Roy (2005) The Library of Alexandria: Centre of Learning in the Ancient World, London: Tauris and Co Ltd, pp.2-10.

Waldemar Januszczak (2012) BBC’s The Dark Ages: An Age of Light:The Clash of Gods Episode 1, dir. Januszczak Waldemar, Online: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EK1KTqjbAjE (accessed 5 April 2013).

Challenges Being Faced

Elements that need developing:

*Longer to create the dresses without all 4 pairs of hands.  Solve this by keeping white top and bottoms as base and use a mannequin to hold skirts.  Make all skirts first. (Below are 4 different dress designs -despite the fact that Emily is no longer wearing a dress- based on Poiret and Worth’s ideas):

 

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

Nicholls, Natasha 2013

 

*Need lots of tape and pins, enough to make 3 dresses.  Emily is now acting as tech to increase the amount of performance time we will have when on the stools.

*Lots of sacrificial images in L’art Religieux books.  Research into 13/14th century sacrifice and punishment.  Discover actions to pose in.  The content would then be ground in the history of the books we wear.

*Destroying books, other than L’art Religieux…?

Word Count: 142

Posted: May 9th, 2013
Categories: Les dames des livres, Library
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Fashion…put it on me!

 

Please Listen:   Fashion_Blog

 

Pochna-France 1992, Dior: Fashion Memoir.

Pochna-France 1992, Dior: Fashion Memoir.

Pochna-France 1992, Dior: Fashion Memoir.

Pochna-France 1992, Dior: Fashion Memoir.

 

Nuzzi 1980, Fashion in Paris.

Nuzzi 1980, Fashion in Paris from the “Journal des Dames et des Modes 1912-1913″.

 

Nuzzi 1980, Fashion in Paris from the "Journal des Dames et des Modes 1912-1913".

Nuzzi 1980, Fashion in Paris from the “Journal des Dames et des Modes 1912-1913″.

Word Count: 45

Works Cited:

Anon, Roots of Modernism/Reactions to 19th Century Progress and Industrialization Online: http://www.unc.edu/depts/europe/pedagogy/meta/mod1/time_europe.pdf (accessed March 9 2013).

Koda, Harold and Andrew Bolton (2008) Paul Poiret (1879-1944): InHeilbrunn Timeline of Art History, Online: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/poir/hd_poir.htm (accessed March 9 2013).

Mâlé, Emile (1922) L’art Religieux, Paris: Librairie Armand Colin.

Nuzzi, Cristina (1980) Fashion in Paris: From the “Journal des Dames et des Modes 1912-1913”, London and Milan: Thames and Hudson and Franco Maria Ricci.

Pochna-France, Marie (1992) Dior: Fashion Memoir, London: Thames and Hudson.

Rewald, Sabine (2004) Fauvism: InHeilbrunn Timeline of Art History, Online: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/fauv/hd_fauv.htm (accessed March 9 2013).

Steele, Valerie (1998) Paris Fashion: Cultural History, 2nd edn, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.

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